Adding DTrace probes to your applications

A new article on adding DTrace probes to your application has been published on IBM developerWorks: DTrace provides a rich environment of probes that can be used to monitor the execution of your system, from the kernel up to your application. You …

A new article on adding DTrace probes to your application has been published on IBM developerWorks:

DTrace provides a rich environment of probes that can be used to monitor the execution of your system, from the kernel up to your application. You can perform a significant amount of examination without changing your application, but to get detailed statistics, you need to add probes to your application. In this article we will examine how to design the probes, where to add them into your application, the best locations for the probes, and how to effectively build and use the probes that you have added.

Read Adding DTrace probes to your applications

Systems Administration Toolkit: Using SNMP data

A new article on consuming and using the SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) data that is published and provided by different devices is now available: The Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is built in to many devices, but often the …

A new article on consuming and using the SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) data that is published and provided by different devices is now available:

The Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is built in to many devices, but often the tools and software that can read and parse this information are too large and complicated when you only want to check a quick statistic or track a particular device or issue. This article looks at some simplified methods for getting SNMP information from your devices and how to integrate this information into the rest of your network’s data map.

Read: Systems Administration Toolkit: Using SNMP data

Systems Administration Toolkit: Understanding DNS

A new article on understanding the Domain Name System (DNS) is now available: The Domain Name System (DNS) is the service that converts hostnames and domain details into the IP addresses required for application to communicate. Under UNIX, the pri…

A new article on understanding the Domain Name System (DNS) is now available:

The Domain Name System (DNS) is the service that converts hostnames and domain details into the IP addresses required for application to communicate. Under UNIX, the primary DNS service is based on BIND, and DNS itself is a key part of most UNIX installations. This article looks at the basics of DNS setup, how servers and requests are distributed, and exchanged and how to set up and keep a DNS environment running smoothly.

Read: Systems Administration Toolkit: Understanding DNS

Systems Administration Toolkit: Log file basics

A new article on some basic log file information and maintenance is available: A typical UNIX or Linux machine creates many log files during the course of its operation. Some of these contain useful information; others can be used to help you with…

A new article on some basic log file information and maintenance is available:

A typical UNIX or Linux machine creates many log files during the course of its operation. Some of these contain useful information; others can be used to help you with capacity and resource planning. This article looks at the fundamental information recorded within the different log files, their location, and how that information can be used to your benefit to work out what is going on within your system.

Read: Systems Administration Toolkit: Log file basics

Sun Ultra 20 M2 review

I was fortunate enough to get a review unit of Sun’s Ultra 20M2 Workstation Back in the early part of 2007. The Ultra 20M2 is Opteron based, and the M2 designation includes the dual-core Opteron processor. It was a very nice machine that I’m sorry…

I was fortunate enough to get a review unit of Sun’s Ultra 20M2 Workstation Back in the early part of 2007. The Ultra 20M2 is Opteron based, and the M2 designation includes the dual-core Opteron processor. It was a very nice machine that I’m sorry to have given back. The full review is on Free Software Magazine; read Sun Ultra 20 M2 review

Sun Ultra 3 Mobile Workstation review

My review of the Sun Ultra 3 Mobile Workstation had made it into Issue 11 of Free Software Magazine. Here’s a taster: Sun have made some headlines in recent months through the release of their Ultra 20 workstation and a number of new servers based…

My review of the Sun Ultra 3 Mobile Workstation had made it into Issue 11 of Free Software Magazine.Here’s a taster:

Sun have made some headlines in recent months through the release of their Ultra 20 workstation and a number of new servers based on the AMD CPUs. For some this is seen as major change of direction for a company that is well known for the use (and continued interest and development) of the SPARC (Scalable Processor Architecture) CPU. With so many new machines being based on the AMD CPU it will be surprising to some that Sun’s new mobile units are based on SPARC technology.The Sun Ultra 3 Mobile Workstation is based an 64-bit UltraSPARC CPU. There are two main models, a 15″ unit that comes with a UltraSPARC IIi CPU at 550 or 650MHz, and a 17″ model with a 1.2GHz UltraSPARC IIIi CPU. Both are standard CPUs-these are not cut down or restricted versions designed to work within a laptop-and that is a key parameter for identifying the target market for the unit.

Read the full article.If you don’t get the vibes, I like this machine, and Solaris as a laptop operating system is pretty good too. In fact, I’ve start up a new blog, Laptop Solaris to talk about my experiences with this machine and Solaris on a laptop in general.

StarOffice 8 Review – Office Killer?

LinuxPlanet have just recently published my very detailed StarOffice 8 review. To summarize, I like it, and with a few caveats, it gives Microsoft Office a run for its money. The article is spread over a number pages, with screenshots, a brief TOC…

LinuxPlanet have just recently published my very detailed StarOffice 8 review. To summarize, I like it, and with a few caveats, it gives Microsoft Office a run for its money. The article is spread over a number pages, with screenshots, a brief TOC is below:

  1. Alternatives to Microsoft Office
  2. Availability
  3. Installation
  4. StarOffice Writer
  5. StarOffice Calc
  6. StarOffice Impress
  7. StarOffice Draw
  8. StarOffice Base
  9. Office Killer?

You can read the full article at LinuxPlanet.