Sun Ultra 20 M2 review

I was fortunate enough to get a review unit of Sun’s Ultra 20M2 Workstation Back in the early part of 2007. The Ultra 20M2 is Opteron based, and the M2 designation includes the dual-core Opteron processor. It was a very nice machine that I’m sorry…

I was fortunate enough to get a review unit of Sun’s Ultra 20M2 Workstation Back in the early part of 2007. The Ultra 20M2 is Opteron based, and the M2 designation includes the dual-core Opteron processor. It was a very nice machine that I’m sorry to have given back. The full review is on Free Software Magazine; read Sun Ultra 20 M2 review

Understanding MySQL Internals

Sash Pachev has written a new guide on Understanding MySQL Internals for O’Reilly. I was one of the technical reviewers on this book and can tell you that it makes a good read if you want to understand more of what is going on under the hood in My…

Sash Pachev has written a new guide on Understanding MySQL Internals for O’Reilly. I was one of the technical reviewers on this book and can tell you that it makes a good read if you want to understand more of what is going on under the hood in MySQL. There’s a lot to cover, for example the pluggable storage engine archtiecture, how queries are parsed and executed, and how individual storage engines work. The book is compact, but very readable, and worth a look if you any interest in how databases are programmed, or are thinking about building your own storage engine to plug into MySQL.

Computerworld Podcast on the T1000

Computerworld’s podcast this week features a short interview with me on my aventures with the T1000. The podcast Computerworld Input Output: The NYPD’s expanded data warehouse; testing out Sun’s T1000. For the in-depth review of the T1000: T1000 i…

Computerworld’s podcast this week features a short interview with me on my aventures with the T1000. The podcast Computerworld Input Output: The NYPD’s expanded data warehouse; testing out Sun’s T1000.For the in-depth review of the T1000: T1000 in more detail

Sun Ultra 3 Mobile Workstation review

My review of the Sun Ultra 3 Mobile Workstation had made it into Issue 11 of Free Software Magazine. Here’s a taster: Sun have made some headlines in recent months through the release of their Ultra 20 workstation and a number of new servers based…

My review of the Sun Ultra 3 Mobile Workstation had made it into Issue 11 of Free Software Magazine.Here’s a taster:

Sun have made some headlines in recent months through the release of their Ultra 20 workstation and a number of new servers based on the AMD CPUs. For some this is seen as major change of direction for a company that is well known for the use (and continued interest and development) of the SPARC (Scalable Processor Architecture) CPU. With so many new machines being based on the AMD CPU it will be surprising to some that Sun’s new mobile units are based on SPARC technology.The Sun Ultra 3 Mobile Workstation is based an 64-bit UltraSPARC CPU. There are two main models, a 15″ unit that comes with a UltraSPARC IIi CPU at 550 or 650MHz, and a 17″ model with a 1.2GHz UltraSPARC IIIi CPU. Both are standard CPUs-these are not cut down or restricted versions designed to work within a laptop-and that is a key parameter for identifying the target market for the unit.

Read the full article.If you don’t get the vibes, I like this machine, and Solaris as a laptop operating system is pretty good too. In fact, I’ve start up a new blog, Laptop Solaris to talk about my experiences with this machine and Solaris on a laptop in general.

StarOffice 8 Review – Office Killer?

LinuxPlanet have just recently published my very detailed StarOffice 8 review. To summarize, I like it, and with a few caveats, it gives Microsoft Office a run for its money. The article is spread over a number pages, with screenshots, a brief TOC…

LinuxPlanet have just recently published my very detailed StarOffice 8 review. To summarize, I like it, and with a few caveats, it gives Microsoft Office a run for its money. The article is spread over a number pages, with screenshots, a brief TOC is below:

  1. Alternatives to Microsoft Office
  2. Availability
  3. Installation
  4. StarOffice Writer
  5. StarOffice Calc
  6. StarOffice Impress
  7. StarOffice Draw
  8. StarOffice Base
  9. Office Killer?

You can read the full article at LinuxPlanet.

Agile Web Development with Rails

My review of Agile Web Development with Rails (by Dave Thomas and David Heinemeier Hansson with Leon Breedt, Mike Clark, Thomas Fuchs, and Andreas Schwarz) has just made it to the the front page of Free Software Magazine. It’s an excellent guide t…

My review of Agile Web Development with Rails (by Dave Thomas and David Heinemeier Hansson with Leon Breedt, Mike Clark, Thomas Fuchs, and Andreas Schwarz) has just made it to the the front page of Free Software Magazine. It’s an excellent guide to programming Ruby and Rails and if you want to do any kind of web development and are tiring of the tradtional web programming environments. The full review is readale on line.

No Nonsense XML Web Development with PHP, Thomas Myer

PHP doesn’t spring to mind when thinking about processing XML data, but PHP is a better solution than you might think. Since PHP is used to develop websites, which use HTML a standard based on the principles of XML, PHP is a sensible choice. PHP a…

PHP doesn’t spring to mind when thinking about processing XML data, but PHP is a better solution than you might think. Since PHP is used to develop websites, which use HTML a standard based on the principles of XML, PHP is a sensible choice. PHP also includes powerful tools for parsing and manipulating XML data. We can use this to our advantage to convert and manipulate XML information in our PHP based web applications. XML-RPC and SOAP also use XML, so the use of a web-based language for web-services is also another obvious choice.All of these situations are covered in extensive detail by Thomas Myer in his new book, No Nonsense XML Web Development with PHP from publisher SitePoint, a long time source for articles and information on web applications and development.

The contentsNo Nonsense XML Web Development with PHP covers a gamut of different topics, from an introduction on the basics of XML and its uses through to web services. Throughout, the straightforward and relaxed tone of the book help you to pick up the background behind what Thomas is teaching you, as well as the specifics of different aspects in the book.We start off with a simple examination of XML and the role of DTDs in the consistency of the XML data. Thomas is right here to point out that DTDs are about consistency, rather than restriction, on the information we store in XML. He also covers the role that DTDs have in validating information, often simplifying the code required in our application to confirm the quality of the content. Continue reading “No Nonsense XML Web Development with PHP, Thomas Myer”