Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer, Part 5: Using WS-RT for work distribution

The fifth and final part of my series on using WS-Resource Transfer is available to read now. In this last part we look at using the WS-RT system as a method for distributing work within your grid system. Read Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer, Part 5: Using WS-RT for work distributionRead past parts of the series: Read: Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer Series

Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer, Part 4: Using WS-RT for grid monitoring

The fourth part of my series on developing a grid solution using the new WS-Resource Transfer system is available now. In this tutorial, we look at both sides of the security session, in terms of using WS-RT as an aid to the authorization process and at combining WS-Security with WS-RT for secure resource exchange.Read: Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer, Part 4: Using WS-RT for grid monitoringRead past parts of the series: Read: Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer Series

Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer, Part 3: Using WS-RT for grid monitoring

The third part of my series on building a grid system using WS-RT. In this third part of the series, we go deeper into the process of using WS-RT as a grid solution by examining how we can use WS-RT to store and collate information for monitoring the grid. From the intro:

In this tutorial, you learn how to use the WS-RT standard to help manage your individual grid nodes. We’ll look at how to extract individual pieces of information from resource data, how to update and set individual attributes, and how to extend the existing database interface to create and expose trend data through our WS-RT interface.

Read: Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer, Part 3: Using WS-RT for grid monitoringRead past parts of the series: Read: Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer Series

IBM developerWork Grid Zone PDFs

In light of the announcement that IBM are retiring their developerWorks Grid zone (see this post), I’ve tried to grab a copy of all the PDFs for the articles I was involved in. There are some missing gaps because the PDFs have already disappeared (notably, the Python grid series), but everything else should be listed below:

Let me know if anything is missing and I’ll see what I can do.

Grid computing zone is being retired

Regular readers will know that I’ve been a frequent and prolific contributor to the IBM developerWorks Grid Zone. In fact, in the early years of this zone I was often the only contributor.Unfortunately, after years of providing us with helpful information on grids, grid software and development and deployment techniques, the Grid computing zone is being retired. While I can understand why, I must say I’m surprised. Although I’m sure we are all more enlightened about grid technology than before, I still think we have a long way to go, and there’s certainly a few things I would like to have covered and expanded upon. I had, for example, some updates and extensions to the Perl and Python grid programming solutions in the pipeline. Let me know if you would like to see these and I’ll post them up here or on MCslp Coalface once I’ve completed them. Until then, I’d like to thank IBM and particularly Mary McCommon (Grid zone editor) for giving me the opportunity to write about and play with such interesting technologies.

Developing a grid application with open source tools

I’ve been a keen supporter of using open source tools and technology (including Perl, Python and many of the open source libraries and platforms). In fact, many of my most popular articles have been on grid technology and open source solutions. Because of that, I decided to put together an overview piece of the flexibility and utility of open source solutions in grids. From the into:

Using open source tools for developing grid applications opens up a wealth of possibilities. The first is a very rapid development process, especially if you take advantage of script languages like Perl or Python and deployment environments like Apache. There is also a wealth of examples available that can help you. Examine the advantages and disadvantages of developing a grid solution using open source technology.

Read: Developing a grid application with open source tools

Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer, Part 2: SOA grid design patterns for computer graphics animation

The next part in the series on using WS-RT in your grid applications is available to read. In this second part of the series we get into the meat of the implementation and look at how to integrate the information that you create within WS-RT with a backend database solution. From the intro:

In this five-part “Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer” series, we look at the use of WS-Resource Transfer (WS-RT) in different areas of the grid environment — from using it as a method for storing and recovering general information about grid-to-grid monitoring and management, and security. We will also examine how WS-RT can be used for the distribution and division of work. In any grid, there is a huge amount of metadata about the grid that needs to be stored and distributed. Using WS-RT makes sharing the information, especially the precise information required by different systems in the grid, significantly easier. Here in Part 2, examine how this information can be shared, how to integrate a WS-RT interface with a database solution, and how to employ WS-RT to support key operations of the grid, such as in node registration.In this tutorial
In any grid, there is a huge amount of metadata about the grid that needs to be stored and distributed. Using WS-RT makes sharing the information, especially the precise information required by different systems in the grid, significantly easier. In this tutorial, Part 2 of the series, we look at how to store the grid information and how that relates to the structures we’ll need for WS-RT. We also look at the mechanics of the Apache Muse solution and at the WSDL we need to write to support a WS-RT application. And finally, we use the basic methods of WS-RT for registration of nodes into the grid.

Read: Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer, Part 2: Share information and integrate with a database solutionRead: Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer Series

Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer, Part 1: Grid services and WS-RT

I have just started a new series on using the new WS-Resource Transfer (WS-RT) standard. WS-RT is a simpler replacement for the original WS-Resource Framework and WS-Resource Properties solutions. In fact, IBM’s own WS-RT implementation is built around an existing WS-RP/WS-RF implementation in Apache Muse. This new looks at how you can apply the technology behind WS-RT within a grid system. Certain areas of the typical grid solution will benefit from the ease of use offered by WS-RT. The bulk of the functionality is a simple XML document that you can access through a structured interface. Over the series I’ll be looking at different ways of taking advantage of this simplified interface, but the first piece looks at the basics of WS-RT and how it integrates into the typical grid system. This piece was written by Tyler Anderson while I was busy moving house. The series intro:

In this five-part “Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer” series, we will look at the use of WS-Resource Transfer (WS-RT) in different areas of the grid environment – from using it as a method for storing and recovering general information about the grid to grid monitoring and management, and security. We will also examine how WS-RT can be used for the distribution and division of work. Part 1 examines the WS-RT standard and looks at how to develop a WS-RT solution using Java technology and Apache Muse.

And for this piece:

The WS-RT standard provides a new method for accessing and exchanging information on resources between components. It is designed to enhance the WS-Resource Framework (WSRF) and build on the WS-Transfer standards. The WS-RT system extends previous resource solutions for Web services and makes it easy not only to access resource information by name but also to access individual elements of a larger data set through the same mechanisms by exposing elements of an XML data set through the Web services interfaces.

Read Building a grid system using WS-Resource Transfer, Part 1: Grid services and WS-RT