Hadoop BoF Session at OSCON

I have a BoF session next week at OSCON next week:

Migrating Data from MySQL and Oracle into Hadoop

The session is at 7pm Tuesday night – look for rooms D135 and/or D137/138.

Correction: We are now in  E144 on Tuesday with the Hadoop get together first at 7pm, and the Data Migration to follow at 8pm.

I’m actually going to be joined by Gwen Shapira from Cloudera, who has a BoF session on Hadoop next door at the same time, along with Eric Herman from Booking.com. We’ll use the opportunity to talk all things Hadoop, but particularly the ingestion of data from MySQL and other databases into the Hadoop datastore.

As always, it’d be great to meet anybody interested in Hadoop at the BoF, please come along and introduce yourselves, and hopefully I’ll see you next week!

Continuent at Hadoop Summit

I’m pleased to say that Continuent will be at the Hadoop Summit in San Jose next week (3-5 June). Sadly I will not be attending as I’m taking an exam next week, but my colleagues Robert Hodges, Eero Teerikorpi and Petri Versunen will be there to answer any questions you have about Continuent products, and, of course, Hadoop replication support built into Tungsten Replicator 3.0.

If you are at the conference, please go along and say hi to the team. And, as always, if there are any questions please let them or me know.

Real-Time Data Movement: The Key to Enabling Live Analytics With Hadoop

An article about moving data into Hadoop in real-time has just been published over at DBTA, written by me and my CEO Robert Hodges.

In the article I talk about one of the major issues for all people deploying databases in the modern heterogenous world – how do we move and migrate data effectively between entirely different database systems in a way that is efficient and usable. How do you get the data you need to the database you need it in. If your source is a transactional database, how does that data get moved into Hadoop in a way that makes the data usable to be queried by Hive, Impala or HBase?

You can read the full article here: Real-Time Data Movement: The Key to Enabling Live Analytics With Hadoop

 

Cross your Fingers for Tech14, see you at OSCON

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So I’ve submitted my talks for the Tech14 UK Oracle User Group conference which is in Liverpool this year. I’m not going to give away the topics, but you can imagine they are going to be about data translation and movement and how to get your various databases talking together.

I can also say, after having seen other submissions for talks this year (as I’m helping to judge), that the conference is shaping up to be very interesting. There’s a good spread of different topics this year, but I know from having talked to the organisers that they are looking for more submissions in the areas of Operating Systems, Engineered Systems and Development (mobile and cloud).

If you’ve got a paper, presentation, or idea for one that you think would be useful, please go ahead and submit your idea.

I’m also pleased to say that I’ll be at OSCON in Oregon in July, handling a Birds of a Feather (BOF) session on the topic of exchanging data between MySQL, Oracle and Hadoop. I’ll be there with my good friend Eric Herman from Booking.com where we’ll be providing advice, guidance, experiences, and hoping to exchange more ideas, wishes and requirements for heterogeneous environments.

It’d be great to meet you if you want to come along to either conference.

 

 

Harvest machine data using Hadoop and Hive

A new article on has been published on IBM developerWorks, looking at the basics of processing machine data using Hadoop, from extracting the core data, storing it, and then determining the baselines and trigger points required to identifying worrying trends and points. From the intro:

Machine data can come in many different formats and quantities. Weather sensors, fitness trackers, and even air-conditioning units produce massive amounts of data, which begs for a big data solution. But how do you decide what data is important, and how do you determine what proportion of that information is valid, worth including in reports, or valuable in detecting alert situations? This article covers some of the challenges and solutions for supporting the consumption of massive machine data sets that use big data technology and Hadoop.

Harvest machine data using Hadoop and Hive.

Tungsten Replicator 3.0 is Cloudera Enterprise 5 Certified

One of the key platforms I’ve been testing on for the MySQL to Hadoop replication has been Cloudera, largely driven by customer requirements, but it’s also one of the easiest way to get started with Hadoop.

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What I’m even more pleased about is the fact that we are proud to announce that Tungsten Replicator 3.0 is certified for use on the new Cloudera Enterprise 5 platform. That means that we’re sure that replicating your data from MySQL to Cloudera 5 and have it work without causing problems or difficulties on the Hadoop loading and materialisation.

Cloudera is a great product, and we’re very happy to be working so effectively with the new Cloudera Enterprise 5. Cloudera certainly makes the core operation of managing and monitoring your Hadoop cluster so much easier, while still providing core functionality from the Hadoop family like Hive, HBase and Impala.

What I’m really interested in is the support for Spark, which will allow much easier live-querying and access to data.  That should make some data processing and live data views much easier to build and query further down the line.