Another developerWorks podcast interview

I’ve been interviewed again for developerWorks in their weekly podcast. As it happens, the interview took place on the one day in the middle of my move that I happened to have to have to work. In some ways it was nice to have a break, but in other…

I’ve been interviewed again for developerWorks in their weekly podcast. As it happens, the interview took place on the one day in the middle of my move that I happened to have to have to work. In some ways it was nice to have a break, but in others, if it sounds in any way less coherent than normal, then you have a reason!For this interview, I’m asked about my new article on JsonML. During the interview, Scott also takes the opportunity to check out how the move is going!Read the overview: TWOdW for July 3, 2007 podcast show notes or listen to the podcast.

Get to know JsonML

A new article, on using JsonML, an *ML markup alternative that allows for the easy transfer of information between servers and JavaScript applications, is available. In this article I look at JsonML. I start by looking at how information is normal…

A new article, on using JsonML, an *ML markup alternative that allows for the easy transfer of information between servers and JavaScript applications, is available. In this article I look at JsonML. I start by looking at how information is normally exchanged between JavaScript and other applications, and then examine the limitations and pitfalls of that solution. Then I demonstrate how JsonML can solve many of the problems with the original techniques. From the article:

The rise of JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) has gone hand-in-hand with the rise of Asynchronous JavaScript + XML (Ajax). JSON is useful because it enables you to easily transmit data that can be turned back into a JavaScript object, but it still requires custom scripting to deal with that object. JsonML is an extension of JSON that enables you to map XML data using JSON type markup, and this in turn enables you to easily create XML or XHTML data based on JSON markup and to build and exchange user interface (UI) elements. This article shows you how to make use of this handy tool.

Read: Get to know JsonML

Develop with Java and PHP technology on AIX Version 5.3, Part 4: Exposing the application as a web service

Part of the PHP and Java series is now available. This part examines how to expose the original Java classes we produced as a web service. For this article: This tutorial takes the Java business application with database created in parts 2 and 3, …

Part of the PHP and Java series is now available. This part examines how to expose the original Java classes we produced as a web service.For this article: This tutorial takes the Java business application with database created in parts 2 and 3, and deploys it as a Java Web Service. This includes creating a WSDL, as well as web service operations. Web service clients can then connect to the Java web service in order to interact with the Java business application.

  • Java Web Services and Apache Tomcat
  • Creating a WSDL file
  • Defining Web Service code
  • Compiling and testing the Web Service
  • The series is split into six parts:

  • Part 1 looks at the application and sets up an environment ready for building Java applications and serving Java-based Web applications using Tomcat.
  • Part 2 covers the main application code and the development of a simple Java Servlet to provide a Web interface to the information.
  • Part 3 connects the core application to a DB2 database for the storage of the survey questions and responses.
  • Part 4 converts the original application into one that can be accessed as a Web service, and it provides the base for the PHP interface.
  • Part 5 builds the PHP interface to the Java application by using the PHP Java Bridge.
  • Part 6 redevelops the application to make use of the PHP Java Bridge in place of the Web service interface.

Read: Develop with Java and PHP technology on AIX Version 5.3, Part 4: Exposing the application as a web service

Develop with Java and PHP technology on AIX Version 5.3, Part 3: Integrating the Java business application with DB2 Version 9

Part 3 of the PHP and Java development series is ready for reading. This part of the series examines the methods for integrating your Java application with a database, in this case DB2 9, so that we can store the responses from our sample survey a…

Part 3 of the PHP and Java development series is ready for reading. This part of the series examines the methods for integrating your Java application with a database, in this case DB2 9, so that we can store the responses from our sample survey application into the database. For this part: This article integrates the Java business application created in part 2 with a database, DB2 9. Data submitted to the Java business application, and we can use the data that is stored to provide statistical information about the responses.The series is split into six parts:

  • Part 1 looks at the application and sets up an environment ready for building Java applications and serving Java-based Web applications using Tomcat.
  • Part 2 covers the main application code and the development of a simple Java Servlet to provide a Web interface to the information.
  • Part 3 connects the core application to a DB2 database for the storage of the survey questions and responses.
  • Part 4 converts the original application into one that can be accessed as a Web service, and it provides the base for the PHP interface.
  • Part 5 builds the PHP interface to the Java application by using the PHP Java Bridge.
  • Part 6 redevelops the application to make use of the PHP Java Bridge in place of the Web service interface.

Read: Develop with Java and PHP technology on AIX Version 5.3, Part 3: Integrating the Java business application with DB2 Version 9

Develop with Java and PHP technology on AIX Version 5.3, Part 2: Building the Java business application

The continuing part of the series that looks at developing an application first using Java and then migrating to an interface using a Web interface, through a variety of methods, is now available to read. This second part of the series looks at th…

The continuing part of the series that looks at developing an application first using Java and then migrating to an interface using a Web interface, through a variety of methods, is now available to read. This second part of the series looks at the main Java application itself and a servlet version.The series is split into six parts:

  • Part 1 looks at the application and sets up an environment ready for building Java applications and serving Java-based Web applications using Tomcat.
  • Part 2 covers the main application code and the development of a simple Java Servlet to provide a Web interface to the information.
  • Part 3 connects the core application to a DB2 database for the storage of the survey questions and responses.
  • Part 4 converts the original application into one that can be accessed as a Web service, and it provides the base for the PHP interface.
  • Part 5 builds the PHP interface to the Java application by using the PHP Java Bridge.
  • Part 6 redevelops the application to make use of the PHP Java Bridge in place of the Web service interface.

For this second part: In this tutorial, Part 2 of the series, we are going to build a basic business application based around the Survey application we first examined in Part 1. Once we have a working version of the application in a standalone format we will then examine how to build and develop a web-based alternative that uses Java Servlets.The tutorial will cover the following points:

  • Building the base Survey application.
  • Building a simple Web servlet.
  • Building an interface to our Survey application using a Servlet.
  • How to deploy the servlet to our web application server.

We’ll start by building the Survey application, including providing the base class and extending the class with the question specific elements. The completed application will form the basis of the remaining examples for the rest of the series. Read: Develop with Java and PHP technology on AIX Version 5.3, Part 2: Building the Java business application

System Administration Toolkit: Build intelligent, unattended scripts

A new round of articles in my System Administration Toolkit has just started, and the first one looks at how to write scripts that can run unattended with logging and error recovery. To quote the article contents: Look at how to create scripts tha…

A new round of articles in my System Administration Toolkit has just started, and the first one looks at how to write scripts that can run unattended with logging and error recovery. To quote the article contents:

Look at how to create scripts that are able to record their output, trap and identify errors, and recover from errors and problems so that they either run correctly or fail with a suitable error message and report. Building scripts and running them automatically is a task that every good administrator has to handle, but how do you handle the error output and make intelligent decisions about how the script should handle these errors? This article addresses these issues.

Read: System Administration Toolkit: Build intelligent, unattended scripts

Manage Eclipse projects with the JRequire plug-in

I used to do my requirements processing using Rational RequisitePro (see Improved application development: Part 1, Collating requirements for an application), but as an Eclipse user I’ve found an alternative in the form of the JRequire plug-in. To…

I used to do my requirements processing using Rational RequisitePro (see Improved application development: Part 1, Collating requirements for an application), but as an Eclipse user I’ve found an alternative in the form of the JRequire plug-in. To that end, I have a new article on using JRequire to manage your requirements process for your applications. It’s an Eclipse plug-in that can be used by an individual or teams, and can import and export CSV and XML based content. Most usefully though, it integrates with the JUnit testing framework, so you can confirm that your requirements are being met by matching those requirements to your existing (or some new) tests. The full tutorial goes through all of the options and usage you might need. Read: Manage Eclipse projects with the JRequire plug-in