Application virtualization, Part 2: Level 2 — Understanding your virtualized environment

The second part of my in-depth look at the role of application virtualization techniques that can be used to develop, or adapt existing, applications for use within a grid environment. Part 2 looks at the second level of the virtualization process…

The second part of my in-depth look at the role of application virtualization techniques that can be used to develop, or adapt existing, applications for use within a grid environment. Part 2 looks at the second level of the virtualization process – building an environment in which our virtualized application can execute.

In Part 1, we examine how virtualization within an application structure can be used to turn an application from a stand-alone solution into one that can be adapted for use within a grid.This tutorial covers the creation and components of the new grid environment required for your new virtualized application to operate within a grid. Whether you have virtualized your entire application, or virtualized individual components of the application, they both need the same range of additional components — grid manager, security and other elements — to operate. With these requirements in mind, you need to examine how information and work might be distributed throughout the grid. There are a number of potential models that can be used, and we’ll look at each of these solutions and how they work with our virtualized application.In this tutorial, we’re going to consider all these points and build a number of theoretical models that can be used with a virtualized application.

Read Application virtualization, Part 2: Level 2 — Understanding your virtualized environment

Computerworld I/O Blogcast: Gears of War

Joyce Carpenter at ComputerWorld has interviewed me again, this time talking about Gears of War. You can here the audiocast by visiting Computerworld Input Output: A new approach to recruiting developers in China; Gears of War review. You may also…

Joyce Carpenter at ComputerWorld has interviewed me again, this time talking about Gears of War. You can here the audiocast by visiting Computerworld Input Output: A new approach to recruiting developers in China; Gears of War review. You may also want to read my post-mortem review of GoW, Martin MC Brown: Gears of War gameplay post mortem.

Systems Administration Toolkit: Get the most out of zsh

The latest article in my Systems Administration Toolkit series is available, this time looking at the zsh shell environment. Like the piece on bash which is also now available, I look at some of the history of zsh, the main features, and what make…

The latest article in my Systems Administration Toolkit series is available, this time looking at the zsh shell environment. Like the piece on bash which is also now available, I look at some of the history of zsh, the main features, and what makes it a useful alternative to one of the more traditional shell solutions. The intro material from the article itself:

Examine key parts of the Z shell (zsh) and how to use it’s features to ease your UNIX system administration tasks. zsh is a popular alternative to the original Bourne and Korn shells. It provides an impressive range of additional functionality, including improvements for completing different commands, files, and paths automatically, and for binding keys to functions and operations.

Read Systems Administration Toolkit: Get the most out of zsh.

System Administration Toolkit: Get the most out of bash

Get the most out of bash is the article in the Systems Administration Toolkit series and it examines the features and utility of the bash shell. Ease your system administration tasks by taking advantage of key parts of the Bourne-again shell (bash…

Get the most out of bash is the article in the Systems Administration Toolkit series and it examines the features and utility of the bash shell.

Ease your system administration tasks by taking advantage of key parts of the Bourne-again shell (bash) and its features. Bash is a popular alternative to the original Bourne and Korn shells. It provides an impressive range of additional functionality that includes improvements to the scripting environment, extensive aliasing techniques, and improved methods for automatically completing different commands, files, and paths.

Read: System Administration Toolkit: Get the most out of bash