System Administration Toolkit: Swap space management and tricks

In a new article in my System Administration Toolkit series I examine the role of swap space in your Unix /Linux system and how to configure and optimize your swap space usage. I also demonstrate a few tricks for helping you out when you run our o…

In a new article in my System Administration Toolkit series I examine the role of swap space in your Unix /Linux system and how to configure and optimize your swap space usage. I also demonstrate a few tricks for helping you out when you run our of swap space unexpectedly.

Configure your swap space (including adding space in an emergency) to get the most out of your system. In this article, you’ll learn how to monitor your system to determine an effective swap space figure as well as examine methods for using swap space for more than just secondary random access memory (RAM).

Read System Administration Toolkit: Swap space management and tricks.

Managing a grid, Part 2: Security considerations

Whether you are an established grid manager, just in the process of developing and designing your grid, or expecting to take over a grid environment soon, there are many different aspects you need to consider. In Part 2 of my new series, written b…

Whether you are an established grid manager, just in the process of developing and designing your grid, or expecting to take over a grid environment soon, there are many different aspects you need to consider. In Part 2 of my new series, written by Arun Chhatpar, we look at the security requirements and considerations in your grid.

Managing a grid involves many elements, from the network and hardware you use to deploy your grid to the security, job management, and job metrics and statistics generated during the execution of your grid, which enable you to more effectively manage the work. In this four-part “Managing a grid” series, we look at key elements of the grid management process, such as identifying hardware and network fundamentals and how that affects your grid process, and how to use metrics information as a scheduling, prediction, and expansion tool. Here in Part 2, we cover grid security and its importance in grid management.

You can read Part 1: Managing a grid, Part 1: Network and Infrastructure.You can read the full tutorial: Managing a grid, Part 2: Security considerations.

Managing a grid, Part 1: Network and infrastructure

Whether you are an established grid manager, just in the process of developing and designing your grid, or expecting to take over a grid environment soon, there are many different aspects you need to consider. In a new four-part series I look at t…

Whether you are an established grid manager, just in the process of developing and designing your grid, or expecting to take over a grid environment soon, there are many different aspects you need to consider. In a new four-part series I look at the different roles and requirements, and both technological and managerial considerations that you will need to consider. For the first part in the series:

Managing a grid involves many elements, from the network and hardware you use to deploy your grid to the security, job management, and job metrics and statistics generated during the execution of your grid, which enable you to more effectively manage the work. In this four-part “Managing a grid” series of articles, we’ll look at some key elements of the grid management process, such as identifying hardware and network fundamentals and how that affects your grid process, and how to use metrics information as a scheduling, prediction, and expansion tool. Here, we cover the core elements of grid networking, along with the hardware infrastructure of your grid and how it affects other areas of grid management.

You can read the full tutorial: Managing a grid, Part 1: Network and Infrastructure.

Application virtualization, Part 1: Level 1 — Abstracting your grid infrastructure

If you have an existing application, or you are developing a new one, what’s the quickest way to make that application work within a grid? Well one solution is to use virtualization techniques – build a virtual layer around your application so tha…

If you have an existing application, or you are developing a new one, what’s the quickest way to make that application work within a grid? Well one solution is to use virtualization techniques – build a virtual layer around your application so that the deployment and distribution of the application, and how you use the different components is exposed through a standardized layer. Meanwhile, within your potential grid, look at how you can create a virtualized environment. Create the same virtual interfaces to core elements such as security, resources, and then build a system that enables you to deploy your application within this virtualized environment. Finally, you should be able to build an interface to your grid that works through a virtual layer. The virtual interface to your grid should look the same as the virtual interface used with a single instance of your application, but hidden behind the functionality of the grid. In this new series of tutorial at IBM, I look at each of these different levels and the theory and practical considerations behind them. The first tutorial in the series I cover the fundamental issues behind converting your application for a virtualized environment:

This “Application virtualization” series is for developers who wish to convert a single stand-alone application into a grid-enabled application through virtualization. By using virtualization, you can remove the proprietary elements and interfaces to your application, and the environment in which it runs in a way that the interfaces and methods for using the application are no longer the limiting factor.The first step to providing a consistent, virtualized environment for a grid is to create a virtualized interface to the core components of the system and your application. We’ll examine the main components in the hardware that makes up your grid and examine how standard components like an SOA focus can help make your physical systems available as an abstracted virtual layer that can be exploited by standardized applications.Main topics:
  • Creating a grid black box
  • Abstracting CPU resources
  • Abstracting storage resources
  • Abstraction techniques

You can read the full tutorial: Application virtualization, Part 1: Level 1 — Abstracting your grid infrastructure.